Joe DiDonna’s Magic Workshops Featured

 

Saratoga

The Saratogian sent its reporter to meet with magician Joe DiDonna on the 131st anniversary of Houdini’s birth, March 24th.

The article traces Mr. DiDonna’s entrance into the world of magic as a demonstrator at Planet Magic. He was so excited to have a job; he dedicated himself to perfecting the sleight-of-hand necessary to sell. His work paid off in his position — he became the manager — and in his life, at 28 he now does what he loves.

From first shows as a birthday magician to a magic consultant to New York City’s Ballet, his desire to learn more and perform better has driven him.

The reporter describes Mr. DiDonna’s style as reminiscent of great magicians and showmen from the past:

His style is a throwback to the snake oil merchants of old, who plied their wares from the backs of cars and wagons, hawking liniments and suspect medicines. Those trunk magic shows evolved to vaudeville at the turn of the century. They, in turn, grew in to the big-trick multi-media shows of today, performed before millions by illusionists David Copperfield and Lance Burton.

Today, sleight-of-hand magic seems so old-fashioned, its spectacle not nearly the razzle-dazzle of making an airplane disappear.

He too intends to move from “trunk magic” to the larger illusion shows but wants to hone his performance skills as he progresses to larger venues and larger illusions.

The young man will offer workshops for aspiring magicians beginning this weekend. The reporter suggests you ask him to perform the very low-tech, “rubber band trick” when you see him there. It apparently doesn’t take the large equipment to give a memorable show. It is likely Mr. DiDonna already knew that.

 

Saratoga

The Saratogian sent its reporter to meet with magician Joe DiDonna on the 131st anniversary of Houdini’s birth, March 24th.

The article traces Mr. DiDonna’s entrance into the world of magic as a demonstrator at Planet Magic. He was so excited to have a job; he dedicated himself to perfecting the sleight-of-hand necessary to sell. His work paid off in his position — he became the manager — and in his life, at 28 he now does what he loves.

From first shows as a birthday magician to a magic consultant to New York City’s Ballet, his desire to learn more and perform better has driven him.

The reporter describes Mr. DiDonna’s style as reminiscent of great magicians and showmen from the past:

His style is a throwback to the snake oil merchants of old, who plied their wares from the backs of cars and wagons, hawking liniments and suspect medicines. Those trunk magic shows evolved to vaudeville at the turn of the century. They, in turn, grew in to the big-trick multi-media shows of today, performed before millions by illusionists David Copperfield and Lance Burton.

Today, sleight-of-hand magic seems so old-fashioned, its spectacle not nearly the razzle-dazzle of making an airplane disappear.

He too intends to move from “trunk magic” to the larger illusion shows but wants to hone his performance skills as he progresses to larger venues and larger illusions.

The young man will offer workshops for aspiring magicians beginning this weekend. The reporter suggests you ask him to perform the very low-tech, “rubber band trick” when you see him there. It apparently doesn’t take the large equipment to give a memorable show. It is likely Mr. DiDonna already knew that.

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