Magician Fights to Recover Skills Following Stroke

 

 

Raymond Wong of Jackson, Mississippi, suffered a hemorrhagic stroke in August, 2004.  His wife, Cathy, noticed the signs of the ?brain attack.?  He felt his arm was ?moving like it wasn?t attached? and the we was unable to talk. 

 

Minutes later, Mr. Wong was in the hospital awaiting life-saving brain surgery to relieve pressure. 

 

Prior to the stroke, Mr. Wong operated two businesses, was supervising construction of his home, volunteering for local groups and performing magic.  After the stroke, this driven man of 51, was working through rehabilitation to learn how to speak again, and how to perform a simple card trick. 

 

The Delta Democrat?s article on Mr. Wong?s efforts to recover and return to work and performing magic is inspiring and frustrating.  The paper notes that in the first hours after the stroke, he could not speak at all.  His wife told reporters, ?When he couldn’t talk to us, he would beat his head. I started crying then.?

 

The physicians at Methodist Rehabilitation Center have helped Mr. Wong in his fight to recover from his expressive aphasia (the inability to speak anything or say what one intends to say).  While he has a long path ahead of him, the doctors, his family and friends are very impressed by the energy and determination he shows every day. 

 

?A major frustration for Wong had been his inability to do magic involving sleight of hand or manipulation. But with a little urging from his physical therapist, Wong managed to devise a new means of performing “magical mystery with cards” using a cell phone and a sidekick he calls Mr. Wizard. 


 

 

Raymond Wong of Jackson, Mississippi, suffered a hemorrhagic stroke in August, 2004.  His wife, Cathy, noticed the signs of the ?brain attack.?  He felt his arm was ?moving like it wasn?t attached? and the we was unable to talk. 

 

Minutes later, Mr. Wong was in the hospital awaiting life-saving brain surgery to relieve pressure. 

 

Prior to the stroke, Mr. Wong operated two businesses, was supervising construction of his home, volunteering for local groups and performing magic.  After the stroke, this driven man of 51, was working through rehabilitation to learn how to speak again, and how to perform a simple card trick. 

 

The Delta Democrat?s article on Mr. Wong?s efforts to recover and return to work and performing magic is inspiring and frustrating.  The paper notes that in the first hours after the stroke, he could not speak at all.  His wife told reporters, ?When he couldn’t talk to us, he would beat his head. I started crying then.?

 

The physicians at Methodist Rehabilitation Center have helped Mr. Wong in his fight to recover from his expressive aphasia (the inability to speak anything or say what one intends to say).  While he has a long path ahead of him, the doctors, his family and friends are very impressed by the energy and determination he shows every day. 

 

?A major frustration for Wong had been his inability to do magic involving sleight of hand or manipulation. But with a little urging from his physical therapist, Wong managed to devise a new means of performing “magical mystery with cards” using a cell phone and a sidekick he calls Mr. Wizard. 

 

“That gave me a sense of accomplishment,” he said.?

 

Mr. Wong hopes to recover sufficiently to perform again and volunteer with local organizations such as the March of Dimes and their telethon in February.  Mr. Wong told the reporter, “There must be a mission for me to still be here. I hope that’s true.”

 

Our prayers are with Mr. Wong and his family.

 

You can read the full article by clicking here.

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