Jadugar Anand: Magicians Need Government Help

Indian Magician Jadugar Anand is in the news once
again.  The New India Press
has coverage
of his most recent set of shows in Shimoga. 

In addition to the magic he's successfully brought to
thousands in and out of India,
Mr. Anand hopes to bring attention to the plight of magicians within the
country.

Mr. Anand told reporters, "India stands at ninth place in the
world ranking in Magic! Yet, the government had not given any recognition to
this art.  Magic too is an art. But,
Government has not identified and encouraged it, as done to music, dance or
drama." 

Mr. Anand is the president of the All India Association of
Magicians.  His organization boasts
16,000 members and yet believes its numbers have not been properly recognized
by the Indian government.

"Only thing government had done for us is it has
reduced the entertainment tax, We do not have extraordinary demands. Give same
facilities to us as given to other arts," Mr. Anand said.

Faithful readers of Quinlan's Inside Magic will recall Mr.
Anand's efforts in the past few years to not only bring Magic to the
Government's attention but to improve society's view of Magic as a profession.

Mr. Anand observed, "There is a invisible screen
between society and magic. No parent will allow his or her children to pursue a
career in magic."

The trade association is in the process of starting their Academy of Magic
at Jaipur and if the Indian Government will provide assistance, they hope to
build a second Academy in Bangalore.

How bad is it for magicians in India?

Mr. Anand told the New India Press he has seen "many
magicians who died of hunger." 

The All India Association provides medical and other support
to members to help combat this life-and-death struggle.

Mr. Anand pointed to France's
use of Rober Houdin's skills to arrest an impending revolution in Algeria.  His message: it worked for France because
they appreciated the power of the art form and encouraged its development.  Magician Anand has a post-graduate degree in
English and his son received his MBA and still performs with the show. 

Thus far, Mr. Anand has put on about 450 shows in Kamataka
plus another 2,000 shows in Southern India.  He intends to continue his push for
Government support for Magic and magicians as he continues his tour.

Indian Magician Jadugar Anand is in the news once
again.  The New India Press
has coverage
of his most recent set of shows in Shimoga. 

In addition to the magic he's successfully brought to
thousands in and out of India,
Mr. Anand hopes to bring attention to the plight of magicians within the
country.

Mr. Anand told reporters, "India stands at ninth place in the
world ranking in Magic! Yet, the government had not given any recognition to
this art.  Magic too is an art. But,
Government has not identified and encouraged it, as done to music, dance or
drama." 

Mr. Anand is the president of the All India Association of
Magicians.  His organization boasts
16,000 members and yet believes its numbers have not been properly recognized
by the Indian government.

"Only thing government had done for us is it has
reduced the entertainment tax, We do not have extraordinary demands. Give same
facilities to us as given to other arts," Mr. Anand said.

Faithful readers of Quinlan's Inside Magic will recall Mr.
Anand's efforts in the past few years to not only bring Magic to the
Government's attention but to improve society's view of Magic as a profession.

Mr. Anand observed, "There is a invisible screen
between society and magic. No parent will allow his or her children to pursue a
career in magic."

The trade association is in the process of starting their Academy of Magic
at Jaipur and if the Indian Government will provide assistance, they hope to
build a second Academy in Bangalore.

How bad is it for magicians in India?

Mr. Anand told the New India Press he has seen "many
magicians who died of hunger." 

The All India Association provides medical and other support
to members to help combat this life-and-death struggle.

Mr. Anand pointed to France's
use of Rober Houdin's skills to arrest an impending revolution in Algeria.  His message: it worked for France because
they appreciated the power of the art form and encouraged its development.  Magician Anand has a post-graduate degree in
English and his son received his MBA and still performs with the show. 

Thus far, Mr. Anand has put on about 450 shows in Kamataka
plus another 2,000 shows in Southern India.  He intends to continue his push for
Government support for Magic and magicians as he continues his tour.

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