Sex Sells and Moves Magic Out of Vegas

Ivan Kane's 40-Deuce at Mandalay Bay

Massachusetts' own Casino City Times
is a great source for gambling or gaming news.  To us its gambling
because while we're not smart but at least we're foolish with our
money. 

During the most recent Magic Live event, we became legend
at the Harrah's Casino by hitting on 20 five times.  We pulled an Ace
on two of the times, busted on two of the times, and received a written
warning from the Las Vegas Vice Squad undercover agent. 

But we were interested in reading about the new trend in Vegas:
moving from Magic to Motion.  The dance joints are the way to make 40
to 50 percent profit from the space once occupied by magicians. 

By contrast, industry insiders guess magicians only bring in a
piddling 30 to 40 percent pure profit.  It is amazing Lance Burton and
the old Siegfried & Roy show could stay in business at that rate.

Nightclubs are, in fact, the new headliners in a city defined by its
decadent entertainment, and part of a shift toward adult fare.

In 2004, Caesars Palace closed its eight-year-old,
family-friendly Magical Empire, a dinner theater featuring magic acts
and toga-wearing hosts, in favor of a 36,000-square-foot, $14 million
nightclub, Pure. It targets a decidedly different and more freewheeling
audience.

And when the city's longest-running headliner act — "Siegfried
& Roy" — ended its magical run at the Mirage after a tiger mauled
Roy Horn, the resort turned not to another G-rated headliner but to
free-spending young adults who like to dance until dawn. The hotel just
opened Jet, a 15,000-square-foot nightclub.

High profit margin

Casino executives say nightclubs sustain a 40 percent profit
margin, compared to the 30 percent to 40 percent overall margin at some
of the Strip's more profitable resorts.

Little wonder. Club operators are selling bottles of premium
liquor that cost them $15 wholesale for upward of $300 in the VIP
booths. The price includes a private table, beautiful cocktail servers,
ice, mixers and lots of looks.

Such spending isn't limited to celebrities. Customers also
include average Joes who have saved weeks or months for their
impressive night out.

Check out the full article to read about the risque clubs replacing the old close-up tables.
(pictured: Ivan Kane's 40-Deuce Night Club at Mandalay Bay).

     

Ivan Kane's 40-Deuce at Mandalay Bay

Massachusetts' own Casino City Times
is a great source for gambling or gaming news.  To us its gambling
because while we're not smart but at least we're foolish with our
money. 

During the most recent Magic Live event, we became legend
at the Harrah's Casino by hitting on 20 five times.  We pulled an Ace
on two of the times, busted on two of the times, and received a written
warning from the Las Vegas Vice Squad undercover agent. 

But we were interested in reading about the new trend in Vegas:
moving from Magic to Motion.  The dance joints are the way to make 40
to 50 percent profit from the space once occupied by magicians. 

By contrast, industry insiders guess magicians only bring in a
piddling 30 to 40 percent pure profit.  It is amazing Lance Burton and
the old Siegfried & Roy show could stay in business at that rate.

Nightclubs are, in fact, the new headliners in a city defined by its
decadent entertainment, and part of a shift toward adult fare.

In 2004, Caesars Palace closed its eight-year-old,
family-friendly Magical Empire, a dinner theater featuring magic acts
and toga-wearing hosts, in favor of a 36,000-square-foot, $14 million
nightclub, Pure. It targets a decidedly different and more freewheeling
audience.

And when the city's longest-running headliner act — "Siegfried
& Roy" — ended its magical run at the Mirage after a tiger mauled
Roy Horn, the resort turned not to another G-rated headliner but to
free-spending young adults who like to dance until dawn. The hotel just
opened Jet, a 15,000-square-foot nightclub.

High profit margin

Casino executives say nightclubs sustain a 40 percent profit
margin, compared to the 30 percent to 40 percent overall margin at some
of the Strip's more profitable resorts.

Little wonder. Club operators are selling bottles of premium
liquor that cost them $15 wholesale for upward of $300 in the VIP
booths. The price includes a private table, beautiful cocktail servers,
ice, mixers and lots of looks.

Such spending isn't limited to celebrities. Customers also
include average Joes who have saved weeks or months for their
impressive night out.

Check out the full article to read about the risque clubs replacing the old close-up tables.
(pictured: Ivan Kane's 40-Deuce Night Club at Mandalay Bay).

     

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