Student Reporter’s Charming Look at Copperfield

A Student Reporter Wonders

We don’t know K.C. Vetter and we use the word “know” in the non-biblical sense.  That’s not to say we know her in the biblical sense, either. 

We just don’t know her, that’s all. But we wish we did.  We checked out her other opinion pieces on The Western Courier and were impressed by her production and novel approach. 

But
we enjoyed — although we did not know why we enjoyed — what K.C.
Vetter knew or did not know about David Copperfield’s well-publicized
Magical Impregnation effect.  She writes in The Western Courier this afternoon with either the satiric pen of Swift or youthful innocence. 

The article to which she refers was discussed last week on Today’s Magic News.

Ms. Vetter suggests magic may have lost its gusto. 

The
tricks aren’t as impressive anymore.  “Some people believe in
magic and some don’t. Magic is meant to entertain, whether it’s real or
not. But when is magic taken too far?”

The author suggests Mr.
Copperfield “doesn’t seem content with those accomplishments. Now he’s
going to kick it up a notch and essentially be playing God.”

She asks the musical question, “Wait a second. He’s going to make a girl pregnant right on stage? I don’t think so.”

Ms.
Vetter wonderfully accepts the premise and then considers the real-life
implications of making someone pregnant on stage. 

For instance, she asks, “How can he prove that he did it?”

Will
she be followed for the next nine months, take a pregnancy test? Plus,
Ms. Vetter asks, “how will we know she wasn’t pregnant when she came to
the show?”

This really is a charming article and we’re not trying to be patronizing.  But consider her last three paragraphs :

But
this is stupid. There aren’t any tests that can be done to prove this
woman got pregnant right there on stage. I suppose she could take a
pregnancy test right there in front of a crowd to prove that she’s
really not pregnant when this whole thing starts. But then what?
Implantation of an embryo to the walls of the uterus can take days. It
just won’t work.

And one final question is how he is going to find a
woman to participate? Is he just going to put up flyers asking who
wants to be the present day Mother of God?

The only moral way I see
this working out so it is acceptable to his viewers would be to use a
nun. Then he’d really be playing God. Impregnating a virgin through
Immaculate Conception and all.

We scan the news wires
around the world throughout the day and found no other writer asking
these questions.  Ms. Vetter isn’t naive; she’s insightful and
charming.

We found a great…

A Student Reporter Wonders

We don’t know K.C. Vetter and we use the word “know” in the non-biblical sense.  That’s not to say we know her in the biblical sense, either. 

We just don’t know her, that’s all. But we wish we did.  We checked out her other opinion pieces on The Western Courier and were impressed by her production and novel approach. 

But
we enjoyed — although we did not know why we enjoyed — what K.C.
Vetter knew or did not know about David Copperfield’s well-publicized
Magical Impregnation effect.  She writes in The Western Courier this afternoon with either the satiric pen of Swift or youthful innocence. 

The article to which she refers was discussed last week on Today’s Magic News.

Ms. Vetter suggests magic may have lost its gusto. 

The
tricks aren’t as impressive anymore.  “Some people believe in
magic and some don’t. Magic is meant to entertain, whether it’s real or
not. But when is magic taken too far?”

The author suggests Mr.
Copperfield “doesn’t seem content with those accomplishments. Now he’s
going to kick it up a notch and essentially be playing God.”

She asks the musical question, “Wait a second. He’s going to make a girl pregnant right on stage? I don’t think so.”

Ms.
Vetter wonderfully accepts the premise and then considers the real-life
implications of making someone pregnant on stage. 

For instance, she asks, “How can he prove that he did it?”

Will
she be followed for the next nine months, take a pregnancy test? Plus,
Ms. Vetter asks, “how will we know she wasn’t pregnant when she came to
the show?”

This really is a charming article and we’re not trying to be patronizing.  But consider her last three paragraphs :

But
this is stupid. There aren’t any tests that can be done to prove this
woman got pregnant right there on stage. I suppose she could take a
pregnancy test right there in front of a crowd to prove that she’s
really not pregnant when this whole thing starts. But then what?
Implantation of an embryo to the walls of the uterus can take days. It
just won’t work.

And one final question is how he is going to find a
woman to participate? Is he just going to put up flyers asking who
wants to be the present day Mother of God?

The only moral way I see
this working out so it is acceptable to his viewers would be to use a
nun. Then he’d really be playing God. Impregnating a virgin through
Immaculate Conception and all.

We scan the news wires
around the world throughout the day and found no other writer asking
these questions.  Ms. Vetter isn’t naive; she’s insightful and
charming.

We found a great article from a 2002 edition of The Las Vegas Sun where Mr. Copperfield says the impregnation trick is one he’s currently working to develop.

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