Jim Karol – Psychic Madman

Jim Karol


When did college reporters become so cynical, so untrusting? Maybe
Elizabeth Swain, reporter for The Campus Daily, has seen disappointment
in the past and was guarding herself against the pain.

She was assigned to cover the incomparable Jim Karol’s traveling show, Mind, Magic & Madness.

She entered the auditorium with a less than open mind.

“I was sure I was in for an evening of lame magic tricks and mind
reading a-la Crossing Over with John Edward. As the lights dimmed and
clips from appearances on The Tonight Show and Rosie O’Donnell played,
I felt like they were building up a show that was sure to be a letdown.”

At first the show lived up to her very low expectations. She said the
opening acts by Chris Chelko and Michael DuBois “got off to a slow
start. Chelko’s opening routine began with the lame jokes I expected.”

She’s not knocking their abilities, though.

“It was clear that these guys had talent – it’s not as if I can juggle
seven balls at once or pull foreign objects from my nose through my
mouth – but I just wasn’t impressed.”

She stared at her watch and “found myself wondering how long the show
would last and if I could survive another hour of mediocrity.”

We were like, “Oh my God! This is so baaaad!”

But life changed for the young Ms. Swain:

Then, all of a sudden, my eyes were
glued to the stage as Chelko performed a card trick that ended with the
two of clubs, selected from a deck of cards by an audience member,
stuck to the ceiling. He also pointed out the ace of spades on the
ceiling from last year’s show. Anyone who hadn’t been paying attention
before, certainly was now as the “Madman of Magic” himself, Jim Karol,
took the stage.

She had sipped the Kool-Aid:

“Going into the show, I was very doubtful about Karol’s actual ability to read minds.”

    As each audience member asked himself a random
question and its answer, Karol revealed the names of countries,
birthdays and even family nicknames that they were thinking. Karol
claimed not to read minds, but only to “influence thought.” Whatever he
calls it, I was definitely impressed.

The convert is always the greatest evangelist. Ms. Swain is now Jim
Karol’s greatest fan. Witness her Moonie-esque final recommendation:

While I was skeptical at first, it
didn’t take long for the Psychic Madman to win me over. I found myself
completely engrossed in a performance of mind-boggling tricks, stunts
and mind reading. I definitely recommend going to see Karol and company
if they return to UR to entertain, impress and perhaps add another
playing card to the ceiling of Strong Auditorium.”

To quote a television advertisement for the 1970’s revival of The King
and I musical on Broadway, “For a kid like me to like a show like that,
it’s got to be great!”

We never doubted Mr. Karol’s ability.

Visit Mr. Karol’s outstanding web site at: http://www.mindwiz.com/

Jim Karol


When did college reporters become so cynical, so untrusting? Maybe
Elizabeth Swain, reporter for The Campus Daily, has seen disappointment
in the past and was guarding herself against the pain.

She was assigned to cover the incomparable Jim Karol’s traveling show, Mind, Magic & Madness.

She entered the auditorium with a less than open mind.

“I was sure I was in for an evening of lame magic tricks and mind
reading a-la Crossing Over with John Edward. As the lights dimmed and
clips from appearances on The Tonight Show and Rosie O’Donnell played,
I felt like they were building up a show that was sure to be a letdown.”

At first the show lived up to her very low expectations. She said the
opening acts by Chris Chelko and Michael DuBois “got off to a slow
start. Chelko’s opening routine began with the lame jokes I expected.”

She’s not knocking their abilities, though.

“It was clear that these guys had talent – it’s not as if I can juggle
seven balls at once or pull foreign objects from my nose through my
mouth – but I just wasn’t impressed.”

She stared at her watch and “found myself wondering how long the show
would last and if I could survive another hour of mediocrity.”

We were like, “Oh my God! This is so baaaad!”

But life changed for the young Ms. Swain:

Then, all of a sudden, my eyes were
glued to the stage as Chelko performed a card trick that ended with the
two of clubs, selected from a deck of cards by an audience member,
stuck to the ceiling. He also pointed out the ace of spades on the
ceiling from last year’s show. Anyone who hadn’t been paying attention
before, certainly was now as the “Madman of Magic” himself, Jim Karol,
took the stage.

She had sipped the Kool-Aid:

“Going into the show, I was very doubtful about Karol’s actual ability to read minds.”

    As each audience member asked himself a random
question and its answer, Karol revealed the names of countries,
birthdays and even family nicknames that they were thinking. Karol
claimed not to read minds, but only to “influence thought.” Whatever he
calls it, I was definitely impressed.

The convert is always the greatest evangelist. Ms. Swain is now Jim
Karol’s greatest fan. Witness her Moonie-esque final recommendation:

While I was skeptical at first, it
didn’t take long for the Psychic Madman to win me over. I found myself
completely engrossed in a performance of mind-boggling tricks, stunts
and mind reading. I definitely recommend going to see Karol and company
if they return to UR to entertain, impress and perhaps add another
playing card to the ceiling of Strong Auditorium.”

To quote a television advertisement for the 1970’s revival of The King
and I musical on Broadway, “For a kid like me to like a show like that,
it’s got to be great!”

We never doubted Mr. Karol’s ability.

Visit Mr. Karol’s outstanding web site at: http://www.mindwiz.com/

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