Bookslut: I Love Tour of Magician’s Study

The Bookslut gives the unusual book A Guided Tour of The Magician’s Study by Tobias Seamon two thumbs up for its authenticity and approach to storytelling. 

We?re no geniuses but it does sound like an interesting way to tell a story.  Instead of focusing on the day-to-day, hour-by-hour flow of life, the magician tells his story after he is dead. 

The author apparently enjoyed researching New York?s magic scene at the end of the 19th Century; and specifically sought as much information about Houdini as possible.  As a result, says The Bookslut, the chapter on Houdini stands out as one of the most interesting chapters in the book.

We checked Amazon to see if the book was available.  It is.  We also checked out the other reviews of the book critics have loaded to Amazon and other websites.  No one seems to like this book except The Bookslut. 

The reason the book seems to lack support, suggests The Bookslut, is that it is written from the perspective not of time but of place and objects.  We don?t know what that means but we?re going to buy it, read it, and review it right here.

The critic writes:

The true richness of the story, and what will continually captivate the reader, is the juxtaposition of the larger story of America, as represented by Rouncival?s experiences in the Bowery, his friendships with Houdini, Frida Kahlo, H.G. Wells, etc., and the intense and utterly riveting smaller story of his own life and loves. The character of Robert Rouncival, who is long dead when the story begins, completely enthralls the reader; and the format in which his life is revealed only makes the story that much more fascinating.

The Magician?s Study joins two other magic-related manuscripts on the fiction list.  Critics on both sides of the Atlantic have raved…

The Bookslut gives the unusual book A Guided Tour of The Magician’s Study by Tobias Seamon two thumbs up for its authenticity and approach to storytelling. 

We?re no geniuses but it does sound like an interesting way to tell a story.  Instead of focusing on the day-to-day, hour-by-hour flow of life, the magician tells his story after he is dead. 

The author apparently enjoyed researching New York?s magic scene at the end of the 19th Century; and specifically sought as much information about Houdini as possible.  As a result, says The Bookslut, the chapter on Houdini stands out as one of the most interesting chapters in the book.

We checked Amazon to see if the book was available.  It is.  We also checked out the other reviews of the book critics have loaded to Amazon and other websites.  No one seems to like this book except The Bookslut. 

The reason the book seems to lack support, suggests The Bookslut, is that it is written from the perspective not of time but of place and objects.  We don?t know what that means but we?re going to buy it, read it, and review it right here.

The critic writes:

The true richness of the story, and what will continually captivate the reader, is the juxtaposition of the larger story of America, as represented by Rouncival?s experiences in the Bowery, his friendships with Houdini, Frida Kahlo, H.G. Wells, etc., and the intense and utterly riveting smaller story of his own life and loves. The character of Robert Rouncival, who is long dead when the story begins, completely enthralls the reader; and the format in which his life is revealed only makes the story that much more fascinating.

The Magician?s Study joins two other magic-related manuscripts on the fiction list.  Critics on both sides of the Atlantic have raved about Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke.  The book is considered the Harry Potter for adults.  Clear, a book based on an author?s life under the influence of David Blaine?s 44-Day Glass Box of Self-Love is apparently written in an less than orthodox manner but has a powerful message for the reader. 

Inside Magic will soon be releasing its The Clueless Magician, a novel about a former police detective who returns to his magic roots to help investigate a murder.  The twist is: Police believe he is the murderer and the victim. 

The book is currently in early draft form but will be released by Inside Magic Press around May of 2005.  We are currently attempting to get an alluring model to pose in a skimpy bathing suit for the book?s cover.  With our limited budget, however, we can only get a former professional nose model or Al Gore.

The Bookslut’s Column and current review can be read here.

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