Perfect: Jaq Greenspon’s Essay on Magic in Vegas

 

 

Magic Cheerleading

Jaq Greenspon put together a really neat essay/article/review for Las Vegas City Life today.  He notes, ?In a city built on artifice, it seems rather ironic that the most truthful thing is deceit itself.? His article traces the history of magic in the Glitter Gulch with a real understanding of both our art and the commercial realities of Las Vegas.

 

He posits Siegfried & Roy?s appearance within the 1967 hit Tropicana?s Folies  Bergere and 1990 move to the Mirage did not cause the ?flood that followed.  Really all they did was show that a magic act could hold its own on the strip.? The duo spawned imitators and other ?classic? magicians such as Lance Burton.  But in all the commotion, the avant-garde entered the big tent with seemingly rebellious approach to magic. 

 

Mr. Greenspon considers Penn & Teller?s philosophy: “Most magicians, like comedians, measure success by the audience’s reaction, not how well they’re getting their point across. If it gets a big reaction, then it’s a good trick. F–k them. If it does what you want it to, then it’s a good trick.”

 

Kellar, Houdini and Tim Quinlan (R to L)

It is the visceral smashing into the intellectual that matters to the Bad Boys of Magic. Kevin James agrees with this approach: “Magic happens in the head and not on stage.”

 

The next big thing will be likely be the next new thing. 

 


 

 

Magic Cheerleading

Jaq Greenspon put together a really neat essay/article/review for Las Vegas City Life today.  He notes, ?In a city built on artifice, it seems rather ironic that the most truthful thing is deceit itself.? His article traces the history of magic in the Glitter Gulch with a real understanding of both our art and the commercial realities of Las Vegas.

 

He posits Siegfried & Roy?s appearance within the 1967 hit Tropicana?s Folies  Bergere and 1990 move to the Mirage did not cause the ?flood that followed.  Really all they did was show that a magic act could hold its own on the strip.? The duo spawned imitators and other ?classic? magicians such as Lance Burton.  But in all the commotion, the avant-garde entered the big tent with seemingly rebellious approach to magic. 

 

Mr. Greenspon considers Penn & Teller?s philosophy: “Most magicians, like comedians, measure success by the audience’s reaction, not how well they’re getting their point across. If it gets a big reaction, then it’s a good trick. F–k them. If it does what you want it to, then it’s a good trick.”

 

Kellar, Houdini and Tim Quinlan (R to L)

It is the visceral smashing into the intellectual that matters to the Bad Boys of Magic. Kevin James agrees with this approach: “Magic happens in the head and not on stage.”

 

The next big thing will be likely be the next new thing. 

 

Mr. Greenspon encourages the study of magic and gives practical tips for those hoping to learn.  He gives a complete listing of the current shows and reviews some of the acts. 

Check it out by clicking here.

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